The ‘war on women’

first_img the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: Rector Knoxville, TN Thomas Andrew says: February 6, 2012 at 10:05 pm Thank you, Elizabeth, for leading the way. This fight for women’s rights and women’s dignity is far from over. There has been a lot of slippage in the last couple of decades as the U.S. economy enjoyed its heyday and things looked like they would never crash. Now it’s time to get serious again to ensure that women can effectively use our right to vote and our share of the economy, our families’ and our nation’s, to help our sisters and daughters claim their places in the workplace, in our churches, in the government, in the boardroom, and with medical service providers. Lelanda Lee says: February 10, 2012 at 8:01 pm There’s actually a war against humanity. It’s been going on a long time. If you would perhaps move from a self-centered single-issue of sexuality/gender, perhaps you could see the bigger picture. But any action that murders millions of unborn Children of God every year can not be condoned by those claiming to represent their Creator. Comments (34) Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC February 6, 2012 at 5:52 pm Please tell us how we can help. [Episcopal News Service] There is an undeclared war on women in this country and around the world.The recent decision by the Susan G. Komen Foundation to essentially end its decades-long partnership with Planned Parenthood brought this struggle, which was played out in the Internet at head-snapping speed, to a different new battleground.Komen’s founder and chief executive, Nancy G. Brinker, held a news conference and insisted that the organization’s decision had nothing to do with abortion or politics. Rather, she said, it resulted from improved grant-making procedures and was not intended to make a target of Planned Parenthood.Her comments directly contradicted those of John D. Raffaelli, a Komen board member and Washington lobbyist, who reported that Komen made the changes to its grant-making process specifically to end its relationship with Planned Parenthood.By the end of the week, Brinker apologized and said that the grants promised to Planned Parenthood – $700,000 last year, a tiny portion of its $93 million in grants to finance 19 separate programs – would be re-instated. Indeed, in the process, Planned Parenthood received over a million dollars in additional contributions – including a very public matching grant of $250,000 from New York Mayor Bloomberg – in less than 72 hours.No one from the Komen Foundation is talking, but from the buzz on the Internet, hundreds of thousands of people – men and women – are pledging not to support the efforts of the organization that made pink ribbons an outward and visible sign of the “race for the cure” to end breast cancer.That battle was won but the war is far from over. The reproductive rights of women are under sharp attack from the religious and political forces of the evangelical right, the Roman Catholic Church, and the Tea Party wing of the Republican Party. The battle plan is patently clear: limit women’s access to abortion, birth control, and services after rape and sexual assault by changing laws, state by state, and ensure that government funding is not delivered to any agency that supports reproductive rights in any way.  Do this with a ballot in one hand and a Bible in the other. And when you don’t get what you want, cry “religious intolerance.”On another front, human trafficking is a mega-billion dollar global industry unregulated by any country or international body. It is a criminal activity ignored and/or tolerated with devastating consequences for the person involved. Trafficking ranks just behind drug and arms trading as the most lucrative forms of commerce. It is no surprise that the vast majority of trafficked persons are women and children. Nor is it any shock that most of those who do the trafficking are men.The violence continues unabated. A report released in late December 2011 by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that one in four women in the United States suffers “severe physical violence,” and one in five is raped at some time in their life. Millions of women are suffering serious violence quietly at any time.According to another CDC survey, four women die because of domestic violence every day in the United States of America. For every woman who dies, hundreds keep suffering without any recourse, without any letup in violence. They remain alive, but are not “living” by any dignified definition of the word.These are just some of the battles of this war. There are many, many others, including employment, education, immigration, access to affordable health care options, health insurance, the military and yes, the church,As national convener of the Episcopal Women’s Caucus, I receive calls and e-mails from women – ordained and members of the laity – who tell horrific stories of unfair employment practices, which include discrimination in salaries as well as hiring, firing, insurance and pension benefits. These may not show up in the statistics of the church, but the anecdotal evidence is overwhelming.The recent battle between Komen vs. Planned Parenthood gives us many insights on how women and men of quality can fight back for equality. The fatal flaw in the Komen battle plan was to consider Planned Parenthood just another organization. It is not. It is what it always has been: a movement. Organizations are fine. Movements are better.Social media played a critically important role in this battle. Women can mobilize without the cost of meetings and gatherings and travel expenses or salaries for executives and staff. It is relational but not incarnational, so it does have its drawbacks, but it remains a highly effective way to have our voices heard about what happens to our bodies.“The personal is political.” That was the battle cry of the early feminist movement. It has never been more true than today. It is also deeply spiritual. Women of faith must begin to use the tools offered to us in the post-modern world to fight a battle that in many ways is as old as the Garden of Eden.  With a modicum of organization, we can become a movement that is a force to be reckoned with.So, pick up your smart phones, ladies, and take up your fax machines, turn on your laptops and fire up the Internet. Let’s tweet, text, IM, Facebook, fax, phone and e-mail our way to justice and equality.There is an undeclared war on women in this country and around the world.— The Rev. Elizabeth Kaeton is an Episcopal priest in the Diocese of Newark and the national convener of the Episcopal Women’s Caucus. She was recently elected to a three-year-term on the national board of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Rights. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Doug Desper says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls P.M. Summer says: February 6, 2012 at 6:16 pm Religious fundamentalists and radical extremists who desecrate Scripture (“a ballot in one hand and a Bible in the other) to enact laws against women’s’ health and reproductive health, must be watched most closely, especially in state legislatures. Some of the most onerous laws against women are made in rural areas, putting unreasonable barriers between women, especially poor women, and their health providers.Legislators have no business in the examination room, dictating the practice of medicine.And while abortion invokes much passion, religious leaders have a special duty to reinforce that a woman is more than a pelvis.We must also remember the “fathers” of the Church never agreed exactly when life (ensoulment) began. We must be wary of “personhood” legislation, which would give full rights to an embryo in her earliest days.Let us remember we must come to the assistance of the poor, sick, and needy, AKA the already born.Thank you for you work, Mother Kaeton.Let us pray that the Light of Scripture and the Gospel Teachings of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, envelop those who would be false teachers, those who are hard of heart, and bring them the Truth of God.H.G. Bishop Timothy (MacLam)Pilgrim Prayer & Healing Ministries The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: Submit a Press Release February 8, 2012 at 6:58 am The HHS ruling requires employers’ compliance regardless of whether they receive government funds. mary grech says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: Dennis Reeves says: P.M. Summer says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Jeffrey Wells, RN says: February 9, 2012 at 11:01 pm To each his/her own. February 16, 2012 at 12:34 am Thank you!!! At last a voice of reason. You’re right! Call it what it is, I can’t believe grinding up a baby in the wound can possibly be considered an advancement of woman’s rights. The more I read here is that you can justify murder or anything else as long as you slap the woman’s rights label on it first. I do believe in birth control but not murder. Woman should exercise their rights before they become pregnant, that is, use contraception. If it applies, wait until your prepared to have children – this horrible act of Abortion is easily avoided. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID February 7, 2012 at 10:34 pm Paul – If any church of any denomination is going to accept government money to provide medical care, it must follow the law. Birth control is legal. Any religious denomination has the absolute right to its beliefs but it can not deny legal medical care to people because of those beliefs.Thomas – If abortion were murder, it would be illegal. It is not. The War Against Women includes more than the denial of reproductive rights. That is only one battle, many of which I’ve listed in this article. You are absolutely entitled to think abortion is wrong. You are not entitled to prevent a woman from having an abortion if she believes it is right for her. No woman gets pregnant in order to have an abortion. In the Episcopal Church, we recognize that an abortion is always a tragedy but we support the woman’s right to make that choice for herself. Tracy Wood says: February 8, 2012 at 12:23 pm Martha – A more careful reading of this post will reveal that the accusation you articulated was not made about Komen. Allow me to quote directly from this article: “The reproductive rights of women are under sharp attack from the religious and political forces of the evangelical right, the Roman Catholic Church, and the Tea Party wing of the Republican Party. The battle plan is patently clear: limit women’s access to abortion, birth control, and services after rape and sexual assault by changing laws, state by state, and ensure that government funding is not delivered to any agency that supports reproductive rights in any way. Do this with a ballot in one hand and a Bible in the other. And when you don’t get what you want, cry “religious intolerance.”I hope this clarification is helpful to you. February 6, 2012 at 10:36 pm I write with deep gratitude to you Elizabeth on behalf of your global sisters across the world – the struggles for women actually know no cultural or geographic bounds – the injustices we experience simply vary only in the intensity and in the form of the violence being used against us.Kia kaha, kia maia. mary grech says: February 11, 2012 at 11:38 am I am a “so called” prolifer. I am a small business owner, mother to three beautiful women, and a former Episcopalian. At 19 I was single and pregnant. I was advised to abort by my friends and the father. I did not! 30 yars later I provide FREE Occupational Therapy services to the “already born” and our small family business has been named Disability Employer of the year. Why am I no longer an Episcopalian? Because the inner city parish I attended REFUSED to provide information about the local FREE Elizabeth’s New Life Center, & Black Woman’s Network. They are excellent resources for adoption, grants for school, and other ways to choose life for the LONG TERM! My former parish would actively fund raise for Planned Parenthood, however. When I pressed to display literature (not even fundraise) for the Network, I was asked to leave the parish (after 25 years an Episcopalian). So Virginia, please start a dialogue with those you so openly deride. There are many,many of us women fighting for the unborn AS well as the already born. The Episcopal Church just doesn’t want to hear from us! Oh, and being prolife is NOT cheap or easy – the hours and money spent to save the unborn as well as already born adds up quickly.I will provide verification of this information to any who ask. MMG Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab February 8, 2012 at 3:03 pm Most of Komen’s board ARE women, so it’s a “war on women” being fought against women BY women. See how childish your buzzwords sound now? Come to think of it, most pro-lifers are women. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH February 13, 2012 at 3:42 pm “If abortion were murder, it would be illegal. It is not.” Elizabeth Kaeton“Never forget that everything Hitler did in Germany was legal.” Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.“Hell is paved with priests’ skulls.” St. John Chrysostom Mary S. Gould says: February 11, 2012 at 9:30 am The war against women can be fought without killing ANY babies! February 13, 2012 at 7:30 pm Actually, I am pretty sure the war has BEEN declared, against women, and against children who are born and suffering. Here in Missouri, one crazed state legislator, Cynthia Davis, kept bottled up for THREE years a bill to improve oversight of unlicensed day cares because she was adamant that she would only deal with laws that would restrict abortion. She scoffed at the grieving grandmother of a toddler who died in an unlicensed day care, saying that the family merely wanted a “souvenir” law to somehow assuage their grief. This same woman assailed school lunch programs because she said that hunger could be a great motivator out of poverty. http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_742c86a5-e549-57bc-ac3d-fe8a82cb5afe.html February 6, 2012 at 10:26 pm Thank you so much for asking. I have lots of ideas but I’ll limit myself to a few:1. Conduct faith-informed adult forums about Reproductive Rights, Domestic Violence, Human Trafficking, Immigration, etc. in your church and diocese and province. Weave the topic into your sermons when you can.2. Have bright neon colored stickers made in English and Spanish with the telephone number of the local domestic violence hot line and the message that says something like “You are made in God’s image. God loves you. No one deserves to be abused or beaten.” Put the stickers up in the church bathroom. Distribute them in your diocese/province. Put some in your purse and stick them in the ladies’ room on the wall or door or mirror at local restaurants and theaters. Bumper stickers are a little more expensive but they work, too. Don’t hesitate to put your church name or diocese and website on the bottom of the sticker or bumper sticker.3. Do some community organizing – ecumenical, interfaith and secular – to build economically, culturally, racially and religiously diverse coalitions to bring new individuals and organizations into the interfaith movement for reproductive justice. Check out RCRC’s website for inspiration and assistance http://rcrc.org/perspectives/resolutions_2012.cfm. Support Planned Parenthood and the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. Be as generous as you can.4. Invite RCRC to hold Peaceful Presence Training Programs at your church, and/or RCRC’s counseling and theological resources for clergy and religious leaders, so they may help more women and influence policy and legislation on reproductive and sexual health.5. Have a module of your Confirmation/Reception/Inquirer’s Class on sexism at the intersection of all the vehicles of oppression.6. Be a ‘parson’ – a public religious figure. Challenge religious extremists where and whenever they appear by writing to them or about them in your parish or diocesan newsletter or local newspaper. Write letters to the editor or open letters to members of Congress who say or do or sexist, misogynist things or propose legislation. Be an outspoken, clear, strong, compassionate moral voice of a person of faith committed to women’s health and dignity.7. Take an inter-generational group to a domestic violence shelter. Talk with staff. Talk with some of the guests. Listen to their stories.There’s more but this is a good enough start. Chad Huelsman says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY February 6, 2012 at 4:44 pm Superb piece! February 9, 2012 at 6:27 pm This is not a war on women. It is a war against the powerless, silent, innocent unborn.A society that can refuse to recognize the ‘human dignity’ of the unborn can soon turn that same blind eye to other ‘inconvenient’ (the old, the infirm, the mentally and physically challenged, even the ‘different’). In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Press Release Service Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC February 8, 2012 at 5:24 am Please instruct me in some basic facts, because if I am to believe this post, I was gravely mistaken.It is my understanding that the Komen foundation raises and provides funding for research and treatment of breast cancer. That the grant it gave to Planned Parenthood was for local programmes providing breast exams and referrals for mammograms, not for sex education, provision of contraceptives, abortion or the like.That being the case, how is either the payment of a grant in such limited and defined circumstances or its withdrawal an attempt to “limit women’s access to abortion, birth control, and services after rape and sexual assault “? Unless I am to understand you as meaning that Planned Parenthood was not spending the grant money on the services contracted, in which case the Komen foundation were entitled to cease donations, just as any charity or organisation would be.If you gave me a grant of money to work on publicity materials for a reproductive rights campaign and instead I spent it on a campaign for provision of clean water to the Third World, you might approve of the cause but surely you would decine to renew the grant on the grounds that it wasn’t going for what you wanted? the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI John Kirk says: center_img February 7, 2012 at 8:38 am There is a war on women who believe that killing unborn children is somehow to be exalted, almost raised to the status of a sacrament. I’m constantly surprised that liberals on the East and West Coasts believe that folks in the middle of the country are not reasonable, not sophisticated and are rightist crackpots.Could it be that God values everyone and he “He forms you in your mother’s womb.” Folks who believe in abortion should be shown sonograms of a four-week old fetus. He or she is one of God’s children who, if left to live, will worship its maker. Timothy D. MacLam says: Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Paige Baker says: Comments are closed. Featured Events P.M. Summer says: February 6, 2012 at 5:44 pm God bless you for fighting the good fight, Elizabeth! I keep having flashbacks to Susan Faludi’s book “Backlash: The Undeclared War Against American Women” which was published IN 1991, and thinking—how long is it going to take us to wake up and DO something?Russ Johnson–Komen didn’t “change its mind.” Komen has a long track record (since the Clinton Administration) of lobbying against healthcare reform legislation that would have given poor women access to healthcare and strengthened patients’ rights. If you want your donor dollars to be spent undermining women’s healthcare, suing small nonprofits/charities that have the temerity to use the words “the Cure” in their fundraising, or paying Komen’s top people (37 of them in 2010) more than $100K a year, go ahead and donate to them.If, however, you want to ensure that all women have access to safe, affordable, quality healthcare, send your money to Planned Parenthood or some other organization that doesn’t hide its right-wing agenda behind a big pink ribbon. February 7, 2012 at 9:31 pm Oh dear Lord! This makes me sick! Women are killing the most pure and innocent in our society. Abortion is murder – not a blessing. The so-called “war against women” is just a smoke screen to hide this slaughter of children. Shameful. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The ‘war on women’ Round I: Komen vs. Planned Parenthood Rector Hopkinsville, KY the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 the Rev’d Dr. Elizabeth Kaeton says: February 23, 2012 at 11:34 am God bless you, Mother Elizabeth, and I thank you for your clear mind and cool head in presenting the truth in this Episcopal venue. May I add that politics was afoot in the Komen Foundation decision and on their board? Yes truly, there is a war against women, especially poor women, not only here in the U.S. but also throughout the world. Again I say thank you for speaking out. Jenny Plane Te Paa says: February 8, 2012 at 1:03 am I don’t think those who are pro life should be so self righteous in calling their opposition “baby killers”. Ten million (already born) children under the age of 5 die every year from communicable diseases and starvation. The pro lifers should worry about the “already born” and prevent their miseries and death before they push more “unborn” into the world that neither they nor their parents can protect against a brutish and short life. Saving the “already born” would show more compassion and good sense. It would also take more effort than just forcing women to undergo a pregnancy they are not ready for. In short, the pro life piety is cheap. Douglas W. Archer says: David Batlle says: P.M. Summer says: February 22, 2012 at 2:01 pm The left/liberals claim that this is an attack on women’s rights and access to “free” abortions, contraception and sterilization. The right/conservatives assert that this is an attack on people of faith, the Constitution and tax payers.Ms Kaeton reflects the left/liberal view and it appears that the Episcopal Church does too. This left/liberal view seems to be carefully modulated and communicated to keep those checks coming from generous, giving people on the right. Those generous pledges and plate pay your salary, benefits and retirement, Ms. Kaeton.I feel as if my church has left me and my family. I work too hard to provide for my family to have it spent on partial birth abortions, gender selection abortions and late-term abortions as contraception. Please, Ms Kaeton, we simply disagree. I am pro-choice and pro-life, but not pro-abortion.Please, Ms Kaeton, stop the nasty hate speech against those you disagree with, people of faith working to follow their moral conscience. Many of us see this aspect of ObamaCare for what it is – illegal according to our Constitution. Oh, and immoral too. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS February 9, 2012 at 6:21 pm http://ww5.komen.org/AboutUs/BoardofDirectors.htmlDr. Keaton, perhaps you should follow your own advice rather than offering it so freely and piously. Rector Belleville, IL Martha O’Keeffe says: Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 February 20, 2012 at 1:10 am Dear Mr. Archer. There are very few women who are pro abortion. To have an abortion is one of the most difficult decisions that a woman will ever have to make. But most of us are pro choice. There is a difference. It is not up to you or anyone else. Because YOU and others like you are not the ones that have to live with the decision. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Diane Kirse, RN says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Rev. Laina Wood Casillas says: February 15, 2012 at 8:15 pm The Komen Foundation made itself clear that it wanted to scrutinize its funding to those organizations with questionable financial practices and so a collective managerial decision was reached last year to exclude Planned Parenthood due to its current financial accountability. The Congress has likewise uncovered questionable practices in Planned Parenthood. So, the Komen Foundation exercised its conscience to not partner with Planned Parenthood. To ascribe this as a “war” on women is a reaching mischaracterization and villainizes those who do not support PP for their own well-reasoned motives. However, because of the pressure by interest groups, Komen found that they could not exercise their conscience after they made a collective decision last year. Current movers and shapers in the Episcopal Church have often exercised their consciences even to the extent of calling their actions prophetic. The same tolerance should have been given to Komen by progressive activists, including those in TEC, and one wonders why it cannot be generously extended if freedom of conscience is a hallmark of Episcopal thought. That this commentary also goes on to criticize the Republican Party, the Tea Party, the Roman Catholic Church, and conservatives in general suggests a clear liberal orientation; and more than just a question about one organization. By Elizabeth KaetonPosted Feb 6, 2012 February 9, 2012 at 11:04 pm P.M. Summer – This IS a war on women. You can see it if you move from your obsession about the single issue of abortion. If a society can not honor the “human dignity” of a lowly woman, it can, with breathtaking easy, turn a blind eye toward any of the “the lesser children of God”. Rector Bath, NC Paul Spengler says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC February 6, 2012 at 4:56 pm As usual Elizabeth+ raises the clarion call of justice in measured, rational, and stylish terms. Thank you, Mother Kaeton, for putting so well into well-chosen words what we all need to hear. Bless you. February 7, 2012 at 10:00 am The issue is not as clear cut as Elizabeth Kaeton thinks. At stake is not only the right of women to control their own reproduction, but the right of religious organizations, in this case the Roman Catholic Church, to exist and to provide services in a manner consistent with their beliefs. Personally, I have no objection to birth control, I would gladly make it available to anyone who wants it. The Catholic Church thinks differently. I have no right, nor does Planned Parenthood, or the Episcopal Church, or the Obama administration to interfere in the internal affairs of the Roman Catholic Church. Forcing Catholic institutions to provide birth control would be equivalent to forcing Jewish community centers to serve pork chops on the grounds that pork is good for your health or because some of their employees or non-Jews or don’t observe kosher. This is a First Amendment issue. I am a life long Episcopalian, but in this instance right and justice are on the side of the Roman Catholic Church. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI February 8, 2012 at 11:08 pm David – It’s really, really important, I’ve found, to think carefully – Christians would add, prayerfully – before you speak or write. As Mark Twain once wrote: “It is better to keep silent and be thought a fool than to speak and remove all doubt”. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virginia Fitzpatrick says: Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY February 10, 2012 at 7:58 pm My apologies. Leslie Scoopmire says: February 9, 2012 at 11:06 pm PM Summer: It’s KAETON. Not KEATON. I send the same advise in return. Submit an Event Listing Deborah Griffin Bly says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis last_img read more

Rapidísimas

first_img Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Rapidísimas TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls Por Onell A. SotoPosted Jun 20, 2012 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH center_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service] La situación de Siria empeora. Las Naciones Unidas y comentaristas internacionales están hablando de “guerra civil” ya que ha causado miles de muertos y muchos miles más de refugiados y desplazados. Rusia está enviando dos buques de guerra y 1,500 soldados. El presidente de Siria Bashar al-Assad que heredó el cargo de su padre, es odontólogo, está casado con una inglesa y no da muestras de ceder su cargo. Rusia, China, Irán y Cuba son los principales aliados de Siria. La población del país es de 21 millones.La comunidad latina de Estados Unidos está de plácemes porque el presidente Barack Obama, mediante acción ejecutiva, ha suspendido la deportación de jóvenes estudiantes que están sin documentos en el país desde hace años. “No es todo lo que necesitamos pero es un paso”, dicen muchos jóvenes en entrevistas. La medida podría beneficiar a 800,000 jóvenes. La normativa impone ciertas restricciones difíciles de cumplir. Líderes de la oposición han dicho que el presidente no siguió los pasos normales que establece la constitución y que lo ha hecho para beneficiarse en las próximas elecciones de noviembre.El Vaticano le ha recordado a la Conferencia del Liderato de Mujeres Religiosas que representa a 57,000 monjas en Estados Unidos, que ellas están “bajo la suprema dirección de la Santa Sede” y que hay “serios problemas doctrinales” en sus declaraciones así como “ciertos temas feministas radicales que son incompatibles con la fe católica”. Varios teólogos han defendido a las monjas diciendo que Roma “tiene cultura de dominación”.La diócesis anglicana de Uruguay espera una respuesta a la apelación que ha hecho al Consejo Ejecutivo Provincial luego que éste no ratificara la elección de Michael Pollesel, anterior secretario general de la Iglesia Anglicana de Canadá, que sucedería al obispo diocesano, Miguel Tamayo, cuando se jubile. Uruguay es parte de la Iglesia Anglicana en el Cono Sur de América.En un esfuerzo por evitar un cisma, el Vaticano ha propuesto un estatus legal especial en la iglesia a los seguidores del fallecido obispo francés Marcel Lefebvre. El superior del grupo tradicionalista, Bernard Fallay, dijo que “contestará en un tiempo razonable”. El estatus es similar al que goza el movimiento conservador Opus Dei.Ocho de los diez obispos de la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en Dinamarca presentaron al Ministerio de Asuntos Religiosos del gobierno, un ritual para el matrimonio de personas del mismo sexo. El Parlamento ha aprobado el matrimonio homosexual en las cortes civiles.El presidente Hugo Chávez afirma que se siente “absolutamente bien” en momentos en que circulan rumores contrarios. La Corte Suprema de Venezuela rechazó la idea de que los candidatos presidenciales debían pasar un examen médico antes de su postulación. Sus palabras lapidarias: “Tengo fe en Dios, tengo fe en Cristo, mi Señor, y en la ciencia y en la voluntad de vivir que tengo para seguir batallando por este país”.Ciento dos obispos de la Iglesia Episcopal en Estados Unidos han escrito al presidente Barack Obama para que anule la decisión de suspender la ayuda al Hospital Ahli Arab en la Franja de Gaza. Fundado por la Iglesia Anglicana en 1882, sirve a todos los que lo necesitan sin distinción alguna. El hospital tiene 120 empleados, es administrado por la diócesis de Jerusalén y no por Hamas, el partido palestino que gobierna la franja.El Parlamento de Noruega ha votado por la separación de la Iglesia Luterana con el estado, decisión que debe ser confirmada en una enmienda constitucional. En la práctica, el cambio significa que el estado renuncia a cualquier control sobre la Iglesia de Noruega, incluyendo el nombramiento de pastores y obispos. La decisión, además, establece la igualdad de todas las religiones representadas en el país.Roberto Cazorla, escritor y antiguo corresponsal de la agencia noticiosa EFE de España, dice en el semanario Libre de Miami que la expansión de China le atemoriza. Cita como ejemplo que en 1963 había dos restaurantes chinos en Madrid y hoy el 60 por ciento de los comercios de Madrid son chinos.¿Cuál es la misión de la iglesia? El Consejo Consultivo Anglicano en Londres, propuso cinco responsabilidades: 1. Proclamar las buenas nuevas del Reino. 2. Enseñar, bautizar y nutrir a los nuevos creyentes. 3. Responder a las necesidades humanas en servicio amoroso. 4. Buscar la transformación de las estructuras injustas de la sociedad. 5. Proteger la integridad de la creación y sostener y renovar la vida de la tierra.PREGUNTA. ¿Soy yo acaso guarda de mi hermano? Respuesta de Caín cuando el Señor le preguntó por Abel. (Génesis 4:9). Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC last_img read more

Los diputados piden que el obispo presidente retenga la sede…

first_img Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Por Melodie WoermanPosted Jul 8, 2012 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listingcenter_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Press Release Featured Events Rector Smithfield, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Los diputados piden que el obispo presidente retenga la sede diocesana [Episcopal News Service – Indianápolis] La Cámara de los Diputados dio otro paso hacia el cambio de status quo de la iglesia cuando se adoptó una resolución que permite que el próximo obispo presidente, que será elegido en el año 2015, permanezca siendo obispo diocesano. Los cánones actuales requieren que el obispo presidente renuncie a su sede en las elecciones.El debate sobre la resolución B013 se centró en si esta acción debe llevarse a cabo ahora o esperar a una discusión más amplia acerca de la restructuración que está siendo tratada por la Comisión de Estructura.El Muy Reverendo Bill Ellis, deputado de Spokane, comparó esta acción a “poner el carro bien delante del caballo”. Dijo: “No tenemos idea en qué nos estamos metiendo. Ni siquiera hemos empezado a hablar acerca de una nueva comprensión del oficio del obispo presidente y si es o no apropiada una medida de este tipo”.La Dra. Fredrica Thompsett, diputada de Massachusetts, abogó por tomar ahora esta acción. Dijo que ella y otros miembros de la Comisión de Estructura “eran conscientes de que tenemos que mirar a todo el conjunto, pero también tenemos que empezar. Esto nos da una posibilidad creativa y permisiva que favorezca una toma de decisiones racional y opciones en un periodo en el que estamos considerando, y vamos a considerar el nombramiento de un próximo obispo presidente”.Otros oradores se preguntaron si era posible que alguien sirviera como obispo diocesano y como obispo presidente, teniendo en cuenta las exigencias de ambos trabajos. En última instancia los diputados votaron a favor de adoptar la resolución y la remitieron a la Cámara de los Obispos para su consideración.También se aprobó la resolución D037, que pide al Comité Permanente Conjunto de Programa, Presupuesto y Finanzas que considere la restauración de casi $3 millones en fondos para la formación cristiana y la pastoral juvenil, que habían sido cortados en los borradores del presupuesto.Las deputados también eligieron a 12 personas en calidad de fideicomisarios del Church Pension Fund (Fondos de Pensión de la Iglesia):Diane B. PollardBarbara B. CreedGeorge L.W. WernerDiane M. Jardine BruceRosalie Simmonds BallentimeGordon FowlerVincent C. CurrieRyan K. KusumotoKathryn Weathersby McCormickDelbert C. GloverSleiman (Soloman) OwaydaCecil WrayLos diputados también escucharon a Marcia Hines, presidente de las Mujeres de la Iglesia Episcopal, que se reúnen para su reunión trienal, y al reverendo George Werner, quien desempeñó como presidente de la Cámara de los Diputados desde 2000 hasta 2006.También se aprobaron otras resoluciones sobre una variedad de temas:D042 – pedir que de nuevo la iglesia siga protegiendo a las víctimas de la trata de personas;A114 – un llamado para aumentar los fondos destinados a las misiones mundiales;A107 – designar al secretario de la Convención General como registrador oficial de la Convención;A026 – pedir al oficial de operaciones de la iglesia que desarrolle un plan estratégico de la tecnología de la información para el personal del Centro de la Iglesia EpiscopalA035 – reafirmar el compromiso de la iglesia en las relaciones interreligiosas a todos los niveles;B017 – pedir a la iglesia que apoye el Hospital Al Ahli de la Diócesis de Jerusalén en Gaza, con la recaudación de fondos y la defensa después de que la Agencia de las Naciones Unidas de Ayuda y Obras y recortara su ayuda financiera, recortando el presupuesto del hospital casi a la mitad.— Melodie Woerman es un miembro del equipo de Episcopal News Service en la Convención General. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

Hispanic artist offers colorful reflections at General Convention

first_img General Convention, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Joan Reed says: Rector Bath, NC Holly Stauffer says: By ENS staffPosted Jul 7, 2012 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Hispanic artist offers colorful reflections at General Convention Associate Rector Columbus, GA July 8, 2012 at 7:18 pm Dear friends:Enedina is a gift to anyone who hears her voice and sees the light of her art. So grateful that she is a leader in the Episcopal Church and sharing her insights and illuminations at the General Convention.Look up her website at EneArt.com. Meeting Enedina is a way to learn of [email protected] spirituality and San Antonio Folk art. So proud to call Enedina, “mi Amiga!”De su carnal from el WestSide Director of Music Morristown, NJ Father Richard Aguilar says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET July 8, 2012 at 10:16 am I would love a tshirt with the top image! Imelda Favila says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Collierville, TN Ethnic Ministries, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT July 8, 2012 at 8:01 am Very cool Enedina – Thanks for bringing the 77th to us in a new and colorful “plugged in” light. These are fun and led one into a different kind of presence with the conventions “goings on.” The art of today — which you speak to — has the ability to “touch” beyond touch – how spiritual is that? And powerful. Father Richard Aguilar says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Enedina Vasquez of San Antonio, Texas, is the Hispanic Ministries Team’s artist-in-residence at General Convention in Indianapolis.[Episcopal News Service — Indianapolis] General Convention is, for the most part, a world of words, but Enedina Vasquez is giving it a visual interpretation with colorful drawings reflecting her experiences at this year’s meeting in Indianapolis.Vasquez, a resident of San Antonio, in the Diocese of West Texas, is at the convention as artist-in-residence for the Hispanic Ministries team headed by Rev. Canon Anthony Guillen, missioner for Latino/Hispanic ministries for the Episcopal Church.Vasquez’s artworks and written reflections may be found here.She served in a similar capacity at the New Communities Conference held in San Diego, California, earlier this year.Enedina Vasquez has created a series of drawings illustrating the Anglican Communion’s “Five Marks of Mission,” which have been adopted as guiding principles by the Episcopal Church. The fourth mark is illustrated here.It was at that meeting that Vasquez began to draw on her iPad colorful reactions to the issues being discussed at that meeting, which focused on ethnic and emerging ministries in the Episcopal Church. For instance, when she participated in a Native American sage and water prayer blessing, she painted a sprig of sage with droplets of water streaming from it, set against the blue sky. When one of the speakers mentioned that the Episcopal Church should “change our context or at least consider it …” Vasquez drew the Episcopal shield in just a few strokes of red, white, and blue as if it were in motion, streaming in the wind.A retired schoolteacher, Vasquez owns a business that produces fused glass art pieces. Her artworks have been exhibited in major museums in the United States, Mexico, Japan and Germany. She is a also a published author, poet and playwright; her play, Te Traigo Estas Flores Y Marshmallow Peeps, was produced in the Shakespeare Theater Festival in New York by Joseph Papp.She is a graduate of Sewanee, University of the South’s Education for Ministry program, and a member of Daughters of the King.On Day 2 of General Convention, Vasquez illustrated the bemused reaction of an attendee trying to find her way around.“In today’s world of speedy technology, with young people who text rapidly on cell phones their news of the day, their cares, their fears, the Episcopal Church must go in that direction to catch their eyes so that they can receive the good news of Christ,” says Vasquez. “We must produce and send out news that is instantaneous, to the minute, colorful, whimsical, short and to the point. In 2012, creative ways are available to us through Facebook and Twitter (to mention a few) — and it is the artists that throughout history have reflected the true news of the day for all ages and times.” Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL July 8, 2012 at 1:38 am I would LOVE to see more of her work, perhaps through ECVA? The bright colors and simple designs express the metaphors for events at GC77. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments are closed. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY July 8, 2012 at 7:28 pm dear friends: Enedina is a voice from the WestSide of San Antonio and a dear friend of many persons throughout the world. She is a gift to everyone who knows her insights and illuminations. Grateful that she is a leader in the Episcopal Church and sharing her art at the General Convention. Pray that Christ brings all into fellowship through the words and work of Enedina, mi amiga del barrio. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls Jean Olsen says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel February 10, 2013 at 12:29 am I saw a segment of the Texas County Reporter featuring Ms Vasquez. At once I was caught with her enthusiam for Hispanic culture and her unique way of creating art and expressions reflecting the very essence of our culture. Her home, from what I saw on the program, is a colorful reminder of what being Hispanic is all about. I would love to meet her in person and see her home. Ms Vasquez, you are truly “un orgullo Hispano”. Thank you. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC August 10, 2013 at 7:22 pm Ms. Vasquez, I saw a segment on Texas Country Report today and was so taken with your kind demeanor and soft speaking. I got a wonderful feeling that you are a very special person and told my niece that is a lovely and gentle lady I would love to sit down and talk with – I bet she could share some very wonderful thoughts. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA February 10, 2013 at 9:56 pm Ms. EnedinaI saw a segment of the Texas Country Report ……I love the way you speak and see things in life…. I enjoyed your art ….. I would love to meet you and talk with you…..Thank You….. I hope to hear from you.Mary Carmen….. Roz Dimon says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA General Convention 2012 Mary Carmen Ponce says: Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments (8) last_img read more

El Salvador: Misioneros que se adentran en el terreno y…

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Por Lynette WilsonPosted Apr 19, 2013 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel El Salvador: Misioneros que se adentran en el terreno y enfrentan los retos Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tom y Dianne Wilson.[Episcopal News Service – San Salvador, El Salvador] Para los misioneros Tom y Dianne Wilson la parte del servicio que les ha presentado hasta ahora un mayor desafío ha sido aprender español.La pareja, proveniente de Rutland, Massachusetts, y miembros de la iglesia episcopal de San Francisco [St. Francis Episcopal Church] en Holden, en la Diócesis de Massachusetts Occidental, llegó el 4 de marzo y ha pasado las primeras seis semanas de servicio misionero en la Iglesia Anglicana/Episcopal de El Salvador estudiando español en el Centro de Intercambio y Solidaridad y viviendo con una familia anfitriona, lo cual completa su experiencia de inmersión en la lengua española.“El idioma es el mayor desafío”, seguido por el calor y los mosquitos, dijo Dianne Wilson, de 65 años, jubilada como asesora de impuestos del gobierno municipal.Antes de llegar, Tom Wilson, de 50 años, dijo que “ellos tenían un millón de preocupaciones” relacionadas con ser “extranjeros en una tierra extraña”, pero que la Iglesia ha llevado a cabo con ellos una gran labor de acogida y los ha ayudado a aclimatarse.La primera participación de los Wilson con los misioneros de la Iglesia Episcopal tuvo lugar cuando eran miembros de la iglesia de San Andrés [St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church] en Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, e integraban un equipo de apoyo para un amigo que estaba prestando servicios en Kenia. Cuando se mudaron a St. Francis en 2007, la iglesia acababa de establecer una relación  con la Fundación Cristosal, explicó Dianne Wilson.La iglesia de San Francisco se había comprometido a diezmar, a contribuir con el 10 por ciento [de sus ingresos] a la organización de desarrollo comunitario basado en derechos humanos que surge de las iglesias Anglicana y Episcopal que sirven en El Salvador, pero Cristosal no quería el dinero a menos que los miembros de la iglesia se propusieran hacer una visita, contó ella.“Cuando llegamos allí [a la parroquia de San Francisco] acababan de planear su segundo viaje a El Salvador y yo quise ver el otro lado [el servicio misionero sobre el terreno], dijo Dianne Wilson.Sin embargo, Tom Wilson, ex director de finanzas de una organización sin fines de lucro, no se sintió inmediatamente convencido, explicó, porque el viaje no incluía la construcción de algo. En lugar de “proyectos” de construcción, Cristosal se empeña en capacitar a los pobres a laborar en pro de la justicia y el desarrollo como ciudadanos iguales en una sociedad democrática, y Tom dijo que a él no le interesaba tener un momento “kumbaya” [una experiencia de confraternización superficial], pero al final decidió que no podía dejar que su esposa fuera a Centroamérica sola.“El desarrollo basado en los derechos humanos es un concepto difícil, hasta que uno lo ve”, afirmó Tom Wilson, quien luego se convirtió en presidente del comité de misión de la iglesia de San Francisco. No obstante, fue la pasión de Noah Bullock, el director ejecutivo de Cristosal, lo que puso a los Wilson en la senda del servicio misionero, dijeron ellos.Esa fue la primera de tres visitas que los Wilson hicieron entonces a Cristosal y a El Salvador. Su cuarta visita se produjo en agosto de 2012, cuando pasaron dos semanas viviendo en El Maizal, una pequeña comunidad a dos horas y media en auto de San Salvador y a 32 kilómetros de la frontera de Guatemala, donde la Iglesia tiene una casa de huéspedes y una granja. Los Wilson cumplirán su compromiso misionero en El Maizal, y se mudarán allí en los próximos días.La primera prioridad de los Wilson, dijeron ellos, es enseñarles inglés como segunda lengua a los niños de la comunidad y a los adultos que les interese, y administrar la casa de huéspedes que, cuando esté funcionando, puede llegar a albergar 12 personas.Hay unas 30 viviendas de bloques en el área, y también una escuela episcopal. Es una zona que fue destruida por terremotos en 2001 y reconstruida con la colaboración de Ayuda y Desarrollo Episcopales.En los años 80, El Salvador fue víctima de una brutal guerra civil, librada sobre todo por el problema de la desigualdad [económica y social]. Y en los años que siguieron a los Acuerdos de Paz arbitrados por las Naciones Unidas en 1992, el país más pequeño y más densamente poblado de América Central ha experimentado varios devastadores desastres naturales. Tiene, además, uno de los índices de asesinatos más altos del mundo. La desigualdad aún persiste, con alrededor del 50 por ciento de la población adulta desempleada, y el 47 por ciento que vive en la extrema pobreza.Los Wilson se han comprometido con tres años de servicio, pero entienden que el trayecto a recorrer no será fácil.“Esta es una vida dura, para no mencionar lo que a uno le tocará presenciar: personas que viven en una pobreza abyecta”, dijo Dianne Wilson. “Es una vida increíblemente difícil: Nosotros estamos visitándola, ellos la viven”.Los Wilson están compartiendo su experiencia en un blog que pueden visitar aquí.– Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Se encuentra actualmente radicada en San Salvador, El Salvador.Traducción de Vicente Echerri AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI center_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Shreveport, LA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET last_img read more

Canada: Church leaders sign climate change declaration

first_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, Canada: Church leaders sign climate change declaration TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Advocacy Peace & Justice, Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Rector Hopkinsville, KY Environment & Climate Change Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Anglican Journal] On April 15, Christians from across Eastern Canada gathered at the Green Churches Conference/Colloque Eglises Vertes in Quebec City to learn about how churches can practice better environmental stewardship and to sign an ecumenical declaration committing their churches to creating a “climate of hope” in the face of worsening climate change.Rooting itself in ancient biblical teachings and modern climate science, the declaration committed churches to enact “an ecological shift” by “bringing improvements to our places of worship.” It also pledged churches to “act as good citizens in order to build a society which is greener and more concerned about the future of the next generations.”The principal signatories of the declaration were Cardinal Gérald Lacroix, primate of the Catholic Church in Canada; Archpriest P. Nectaire Féménias of the Orthodox Church of America; the Rev. David Fines, former president of the Montreal/Ottawa conference of the United Church of Canada; Bishop Dennis Drainville of the Anglican Diocese of Quebec; Diane Andicha Picard, Guardian of the Sacred Drum Head for Andicah n’de Wendat; the Rev. Katherine Burgess, incumbent at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church in Quebec City; and Norman Lévesque, director of the Green Church Program.However, to emphasize the collective responsibility of churches in fighting climate change, the declaration was read by all present, and everyone was given the opportunity to sign.The reading of the declaration followed a presentation by Dr. Alan K. Betts, an atmospheric scientist based in Vermont who has been studying the effects of climate change for more than 35 years. Betts explained how the unusual weather patterns of last winter — in which parts of western North America experienced record highs while Easterners experienced an especially cold winter — were in keeping with larger changes to weather patterns consistent with the rise of C02 in the earth’s atmosphere.But Betts also spoke about questions that touched much more closely on faith, arguing that climate change was a “spiritual denial” of the facts. “Climate deniers do not want to see truth,” he said. “We are in a society where the rich are very dependent on propaganda to defend fossil fuel exploitation.”While Betts was very clear about the enormity of the threat that climate change poses, he did not suggest that there was no hope, but argued that people “united with the spirit and the science” can cause change, “because when we stand for truth, creation responds.”The conference was organized by Green Churches, an ecumenical network that began in 2006 as a project of Saint Columba House, a United Church mission in Montreal. In the nine years since it began, the network has grown to include 50 churches across Canada from Orthodox, Catholic, Anglican, United, Presbyterian, Mennonite, Evangelical and Quaker traditions.Following Betts’ presentation and the reading of the declaration, participants spent the late morning and afternoon of the one-day conference in a series of workshops, held in both English and French, focusing on practical ways in which churches could reduce their carbon footprint and energy use. One workshop, led by the Rev. Cynthia Patterson and Sarah Blair of the Diocese of Quebec, looked at the work that the Anglican Cathedral of the Holy Trinity is doing to return its grounds to their original function as gardens.Lévesque, director of the Green Church Program, said that while there were slightly fewer people in attendance than he had expected, he was impressed with the number of prominent church leaders in attendance, such as Cardinal Lacroix and Bishop Drainville.He was also struck by the participants’ passion. “The people here, the interest — it was more than interest — it was conviction,” he said, adding that it was important that participants included people with the power to change church structure.Elana Wright, who works for the Canadian Catholic Organization for Development and Peace and led a workshop on the relationship between food justice and climate justice, was likewise impressed with the level of participation.“It showed that there is a critical mass of people that want to take action and do something,” she said, “and they are following the Christian principles of respect for creation and really putting it into action and bringing it to their church leaders.”Drainville also viewed the conference as being highly important — so much so, in fact, that he delayed his flight to the House of Bishops meeting by a day in order to participate.“It is always a great opportunity to spend time with people who see the same kind of priorities,” he said, “and obviously as an Anglican, believing strongly in the Marks of Mission and particularly the fifth mark of mission [To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation, and sustain and renew the life of the earth], coming here and showing our solidarity as we respond to the needs of creation is very important.”The next Green Churches Conference is scheduled to take place in Ottawa in autumn 2016. By André ForgetPosted Apr 16, 2015 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska last_img read more

New Zealand: Inquiry call into forced adoptions

first_imgNew Zealand: Inquiry call into forced adoptions Rector Knoxville, TN Anglican Communion The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate Diocese of Nebraska The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books center_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted Aug 5, 2016 Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Servicelast_img read more

Stolen vehicle investigation by Apopka police nets marijuana trafficking arrests

first_img Please enter your comment! You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your name here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom TAGSApopka Police Department Previous articleSeptic Tanks: The Wekiva River Basin Management Action Plan (BMAP)Next articleFirst Major GOP Candidate Forum For Governor To Be Held In Orlando Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR From the Apopka Police DepartmentThe Apopka Police Department, responding to notification of a stolen vehicle, found a large amount of marijuana, guns, cash, and paraphernalia as well as the automobile in question at a house on Shirley Drive in Apopka on Thursday.Desmon WilkersonAmong those arrested by the APD were Desmon Alexander Wilkerson, 32, Donnell Toler, 44, and Cathy Lorene Toler, 53. All three suspects were charged with Trafficking Marijuana.On April 5th, the APD was notified by OnStar that a stolen 2018 Chevrolet Silverado was tracked to a residence on Shirley Drive in Apopka. The vehicle had been reported stolen by the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office on December 11th, 2017.Cathy Toler When Apopka Police units arrived, they did not find the vehicle in the driveway, but when they requested OnStar remotely activate the vehicle’s alarm, the officers immediately heard a car alarm go off inside of the closed garage.When officers made contact with the residents of the home, they could smell the strong odor of marijuana coming from inside. The house was held for a search warrant. When Apopka officers searched the residence pursuant to the warrant, they found the stolen Chevrolet Silverado. In addition to being stolen, the vehicle identification number had been altered. Officers also found approximately 48 pounds of cultivated and packaged marijuana, $28,237 in cash, two handguns, and miscellaneous paraphernalia used to package and consume marijuana.An investigation is on-going related the trafficking and distribution of the marijuana. All suspects were transported to the Orange County Jail for processing.The Apopka Police Department is a full-service, accredited police agency with more than 150 employees including 108 sworn officers and staff. The Apopka Police Department supports the Crimeline program to aid in investigations and to foster safe and anonymous tips that lead to criminal arrests. You can help with these local cases – if you have relevant information, please call (800) 423-TIPS, go to www.crimeline.org, or e-mail [email protected] Apopka bulletins can be found at the APD website (www.apopkapolice.com), and then click on “Crimeline”.last_img read more

To fully appreciate black history, the US must let go of…

first_img Elliott Cummings Reply The unveiling of a slave trade historical marker in Montgomery, Alabama, in 2013. AP Photo/Dave Martin Black History MonthBy Bradford Vivian and first published in theconversation.comAs a nation, the U.S. is debating the meaning of Confederate symbolism and history.That debate is closely tied to how the U.S. commemorates or fails to commemorate, the full spectrum of African-American history.In my research, I explore why people choose to remember some parts of the past and not others. I have also studied how communities choose to forget portions of the past in order to overcome longstanding conflicts.Based on this work, I would argue that nostalgic versions of Confederate history inhibit our ability to memorialize African-American historical experiences and achievements as centerpieces of U.S. history.Forgetting and forging aheadA commitment to starting over and creating a new future is a deep-seated part of the U.S. experience. Thomas Paine published “Common Sense” in January 1776, as American colonists debated whether to declare independence from Great Britain. He proclaimed that a “new era of politics” and “a new method of thinking” had begun.“Common Sense” urged colonists to forget monarchical history and culture so that they could embrace a radically new historical narrative. The doctrine of American exceptionalism that Paine helped to create – the belief that the U.S. is not only different but exceptional – depends upon an ideal of renewal. It suggests that Americans are joined together in the constant creation of a new history and a new politics.Paine’s rhetoric argues that forgetting old customs and conflicts does not necessarily mean destroying the past. In fact, the verb “forget” descends from an Old Germanic construction that suggests losing one’s hold on something. Basic English definitions of the term – “to treat with inattention or disregard” or “disregard intentionally” – describe a voluntary decision to no longer grasp something, not destroy it.People today don’t literally remember the Civil War. Neither can they literally forget it. The terms “remember” and “forget” are metaphorical descriptions of different attitudes toward history.As I’ve shown in my research, sometimes communities decide that previously beloved narratives of the past have become divisive and deserve to be set aside. People often attempt to resolve conflicts rooted in history by adopting an attitude of forgetting. For example, Athenians in the fourth century B.C. restored democracy after a civil war with an act of political forgiveness. Warring parties brokered peace by swearing “not to recall wrong.” More recently, former Soviet states have removed monuments of communist leaders since the fall of the Soviet Union.Asking Confederate advocates to forget in the name of a greater good does not mean asking them to erase the past. It means inviting them to the work of truth and reconciliation and foregoing the Lost Cause – a historical mythology that insists the Confederate cause was noble and heroic. Confederate memorials symbolize a form of white supremacy that sought to violently erase the heritage of kidnapped and enslaved Africans and their descendants. They honor efforts to destroy the history of millions while celebrating a wildly distorted version of the Confederate past.Forgetting that distorted vision of history would not erase an authentic past. It might create opportunities for understanding post-Civil War history in more honest and equitable ways.Truth and reconciliation TAGSBlack History Monththeconversation.com Previous articleVote for Mayor, Seat #1, and Seat #2 in The Apopka Voice’s third online election pollNext articleBuilder’s Blitz completes five houses in South Apopka in five days Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. This article has a photo of the MLK monument.How long till Year Zero zealots seize upon MLK’s disdain for the “problem” of homosexuality and demand his statue be torn down?Compared to MLK I’m an moral giant, right? Reply Nostalgia?? That’s our history. Thousands died. The male population of the South was decimated. It may not be personal history and it may not be recent, but people in the South and even descendants elsewhere – this is our history. We may not agree with these peoples’ politics or social views but they were Americans. They fought for many different reasons. Any man who fights and dies in honest defense of his family, community and country deserves respect. And who blames them for honoring their leaders during this period? Everyone’s so blinded by political correctness that they can’t give anyone the benefit of the doubt, they can’t question their own prejudices and stereotypes and really find out for themselves who these men were. You want to tear down monuments because you think everyone was a racist and fought to preserve slavery? Well, h*** you’ve got a lot of monuments and gravestones to bulldoze. Let’s start with the Washington and Lincoln monuments shall we? You want to burn a national flag that represented legalized slavery for decades?? You’ll have to burn the US flag too, because that’s where your logic leads. As for me, I choose to live in the present. Flags stand for who WE are, not who people of the past were. If we allow a statue to stand and our motives are not racist, then how is the statue or monument racist? In the end we are all pawns of political strategists who manipulate are emotions for votes. History will not die, no matter how many books you burn. rmb Reply February 10, 2018 at 9:56 pm JD Confederate nostalgia works against the American ethic of renewal and the desperately needed work of truth and reconciliation. Such work, as in post-apartheid South Africa, includes collective agreements to remember the past differently, resolve historical conflicts, and imagine a new future. Even Stonewall Jackson’s grandsons support proposals to remove a statue of their grandfather in Richmond, Virginia, for this purpose. They advocate for a “larger project of actively mending the racial disparities that hundreds of years of white supremacy have wrought.”Communities can pursue this objective not only by removing monuments. They can also remove barriers to understanding history in more honest and equitable ways.Select figures from the aftermath of the Civil War can help us to imagine what letting go or forgetting the past would look like. For example, in his second inaugural address, President Abraham Lincoln implored Union and Confederate states to reconcile, “with malice toward none, with charity for all.” In December 1866, Robert E. Lee himself expressed a similar sentiment. He argued that erecting Confederate memorials “would have the effect of retarding instead of accelerating” post-war recovery.Ironically, the prevalence of Confederate remembrance today suggests that many Americans have forgotten Lincoln’s and Lee’s pleas to consciously forget past disputes.Vastly unequal memoriesHistorical narratives rooted in Confederate nostalgia exert undue influence over Americans’ perceptions of national history. Distorted memories of Confederate history – depictions of benevolent slave masters and loyal slaves – hinder serious efforts to confront the brutal legacies of white supremacy.As a result, it impedes efforts to memorialize the full scope of African-American resilience in the face of persistent brutalities. Robert E. Lee, Jefferson Davis and Stonewall Jackson are household historical names, with their likenesses preserved in numerous monuments. Not so for black Americans like Benjamin Banneker, David Walker, Sojourner Truth, Ida B. Wells, Booker T. Washington and countless others.Myriad streets and public buildings are named after Confederate leaders. While no comprehensive catalog exists, some databases estimate Confederacy markers number in at least the thousands.Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C. REUTERS/Jason ReedOf course, efforts to commemorate African-American history also exist. They include the recently opened National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., the National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama, and plans to replace Andrew Jackson with Harriet Tubman on the U.S. $20 bill. But those efforts are historically delayed and dramatically overshadowed.These disparities indicate how reverence for the mythic Confederate past hinders the nation from seeking a new kind of future. Pursuing the difficult work of truth and reconciliation is impossible without letting go of the Lost Cause.That work would involve sober discussions about how Confederate monuments, and the attitudes toward history that they illustrate, represent distortions of American history rather than praiseworthy representations of it. It would also require finding new ways to prioritize the teaching and commemoration of African-American history.Local governments have removed statues of Confederate generals in the dark of night. Will we also labor together, in the light of day, to discover more honest and equitable ways of understanding our history anew?Bradford Vivian (PhD, Pennsylvania State University) is an associate professor and director of undergraduate studies in the Department of Communication Arts and Sciences. His research and teaching focus on theories of rhetoric (or the art of persuasion) and public controversies over collective memories of past events. Greg Pearson 6 COMMENTS Please enter your comment!center_img Reply JD Curtis LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Let me see if I understand your point. In order to fully appreciate one group’s history, it’s necessary to purge the history of other groups. That position is one of arrogance and selective recall in addition to being historical revisionism at its worst. February 10, 2018 at 8:10 pm February 11, 2018 at 9:54 am February 11, 2018 at 9:13 am February 11, 2018 at 7:11 am Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 February 12, 2018 at 4:31 pm So razing a statue to the common soldier who died and replacing it with another race doesn’t have the potential to create offense? Not because the offended are racists but because the dead are being dishonored and another race is being honored as more important. Why not simply erect African-American statues nearby?Most Southerners don’t even know what the Lost Cause is and certainly don’t hold the opinion that all slave owners were benevolent and slaves content. That is a distortion of the opposition’s position (though it was not true that every owner beat, raped and killed). For those of us who know enough to care: research by the leading scholars of the field do not show that preservation of slavery was the primary reason men thought they were fighting a war. It is possible that the distortion of history is ALSO on your side. That the majority of these men fought honorably and for a noble cause is not a fiction that was created after the war. Why? Because a majority had other reasons besides preserving slavery for participating in the war. It is recorded during the war, not afterward. The way the south was treated during Reconstruction pretty much threw “peaceful reconciliation” out the window. You know how the North and Congress tried to reconcile? By returning battle flags and erecting memorials around the turn of the century. You want peaceful reconciliation between the white and black communities? My advice: don’t destroy, build. Tip: you have yet to prove to anyone that these statues were raised for racist reasons to intimidate. I suggest you come up with some solid evidence if you want to change minds. Prove to the white community that razing Confederate memorials isn’t just about revenge and suspicions that the reason they are still standing is because the white community is still racist. Prove to whites that this simply isn’t a power play and some in the black community just want to be in control and symbolize they are dominant. Because of the rhetoric of many on the left and in the black community that exactly how this appears. You want the South to forget past disputes: I don’t think statues are about that to most. My question is are you asking the black community to forget? Because if that dispute was “forgotten” we wouldn’t be having statues removed. This is a sad article which only promotes division and false narratives. One does not have to denigrate or suppress one groups history in order to honour or promote another groups history. In fact the concept that current monuments somehow suppress African-American is untrue.Large numbers of blacks and other minorities were involed in the confederate military effort so all memorials to confederate soldiers also represent these minorities. If this fact were taught perhaps more healing would occur.There is nothing that presently is in place that prevents individuals from raising funds and erecting monuments to any individual or event they desire just as those who placed confederate monuments did. The solution is more, not less monuments.Teach facts, not emotional opinions. The war was not over slavery. Lincoln said so and so did Davis. Secession’s causes can be debated, but the actual war was not about slavery. Until facts are taught there is little chance for complete reconciliation. Please enter your name here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate rmb The Anatomy of Fear Major R. E. Wilson of the CSA warned, “If I ever disown, repudiate, or apologize for the Cause for which Lee fought and Jackson died, let the lightening of Heaven rend me, and the scorn of all good men and true women be my portion. Sun, moon, stars, all fall on me when I cease to love the Confederacy. ‘Tis the Cause, not the fate of the Cause, that is glorious!’” “Every man should endeavor to understand the meaning of subjugation before it is too late… It means the history of this heroic struggle will be written by the enemy; that our youth will be trained by Northern schoolteachers; will learn from Northern school books their version of the war; will be impressed by the influences of history and education to regard our gallant dead as traitors, and our maimed veterans as fit objects for derision… It is said slavery is all we are fighting for, and if we give it up we give up all. Even if this were true, which we deny, slavery is not all our enemies are fighting for. It is merely the pretense to establish sectional superiority and a more centralized form of government, and to deprive us of our rights and liberties.”Maj. General Patrick R. Cleburne, CSA, January 1864I well never disown my Confederate ancestors. 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Talk to State Rep. Jennifer Sullivan’s staff next week

first_img Mama Mia TAGSState Representative Jennifer Sullivan Previous articleApopka Police Department Arrest ReportNext articleSmall Business Saturday thriving in Apopka Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 1 COMMENT The Anatomy of Fear Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.center_img November 24, 2018 at 7:35 am Coming to Apopka City Hall this TuesdayJennifer SullivanState Representative Jennifer Sullivan’s staff will hold office hours at Apopka City Hall on Tuesday, November 27th, 2018 from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. for constituent outreach.  Please call Aline Guy at 352-742-6275 for an appointment or walk-ins are also welcome.If you need immediate assistance, please visit or contact our Eustis office located at 2755 South Bay Street, Unit D, Eustis 32726, Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.  You may also contact our office at 352-742-6275.For more details, email [email protected] is in her third term in the Florida Legislature after decisive wins in 2014, 2016, and 2018. She is the newly-named Education Committee Chair of the Florida Legislature. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter That’s nice that her staff is going to be there, but the people elected her, so where is she, that she can’t come and answer to the people at the city hall meeting?last_img read more

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