Rank chief speaks of ‘pride’ after £2m charity success

first_img Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Rank chief speaks of ‘pride’ after £2m charity success 27th July 2018 | By contenteditor All funds raised by Rank employees will go to the Carers Trust charity Email Address Bingo Rank Group chief executive John O’Reilly has paid tribute to staff members that have helped it raise the benchmark figure of £2m (€2.3m/$2.6m) for a carers charity. The gaming group, which owns Mecca Bingo and Grosvenor Casinos, began working with the Carers Trust in February 2014, helping to generate funds for the charity that works with carers across the UK. Employees working for Rank Group brands have taken part in a number of fund-raising activities over the past few years, helping the firm reach the £2m milestone. Recently, the senior team at Mecca took part in a ‘Bushtucker Trial Challenge’, where they had to consume a series of unusual dishes featuring various critters. “Carers Trust is an organisation that is close to the heart of many of our employees and it gives me a great sense of pride to know that collectively we have been able to make such a strong contribution to the charity,” O’Reilly said. “Our teams have worked extremely hard throughout the course of the year to run charity fundraising activities to help us achieve this impressive milestone and without their dedication and the incredible support from the communities nationwide, such an achievement just wouldn’t have been possible.” The funds will go towards Rank Cares Grant Funds, which provides financial support to carers aged 16 and above. During the four years Rank Group has been working with the Carers Trust, funds raised through the initiative have helped more than 9,000 UK carers. Giles Meyer, chief executive of Carers Trust, said: “We are overwhelmed by the fundraising efforts of Grosvenor Casinos and Mecca Bingo. They have gone above and beyond once again and we’re delighted to continue our partnership. “The reality is that three in five of us will become carers at some point in our lives, and with seven million carers in the UK already, staff’s fundraising plays a crucial part in providing the support carers desperately need.” Topics: Casino & games People Bingolast_img read more

Japan advances integrated resorts regulations

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Japan has taken a step towards opening integrated resorts featuring the country’s first casinos after the Fourth Abe Cabinet approved additional regulations governing the resorts.The regulations discussed yesterday (March 26) focused mainly on the size of the hotels, conference facilities and exhibition centers, with the resorts only permitted to have gambling facilities covering 3% of the total floor space.The integrated resorts will be required to allocate at least 100,000 square metres to guest rooms.The size of the conference and exhibition facilities, meanwhile, will be calculated as one, meaning resorts that hold a larger convention centre can have a smaller exhibition facility. This means that if a conference facility can hold 1,000 people, the accompanying exhibition centre must be at least 120,000 square metres in size, but if more than 3,000 people can fit in the conference centre, the exhibition space can be reduced to 60,000 square metres.As previously stated, the resorts must also have cultural facilities that make them more attractive to tourists, such as theatres, music halls, cinemas, museums and restaurants. Content specific to the prefecture in which the resort is based, to promote its heritage, must also be included.“The Abe administration has been working on detailed design of the system under the Integrated Resort (IR) Development Act, which was enacted in summer last year, with the aim of materializing an attractive Japanese-style IR,” Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said. Japan advances integrated resorts regulations Japan has taken a step towards opening integrated resorts featuring the country’s first casinos after the Fourth Abe Cabinet approved additional regulations governing the facilities. 27th March 2019 | By contenteditor “The Draft Government Ordinance Pursuant to the IR Development Act […] requests facilities, which consist of an IR such as international conference halls, to achieve an unprecedented scale and quality as its designated standard and criteria and introduces relevant clauses to materialise world-class casino regulations, with the aim to realize long-stay tourism which attracts tourists from all over the world.”The resorts must also advertise tourists attractions across Japan, and have information and concierge services in multiple languages including English. Where possible, these resources should use “cutting edge technology such as virtual reality”.Promotion of the resorts, meanwhile, is restricted to international airports and ports where international cruise ships dock. As previously stated, Japanese residents must pay an entry fee of ¥6,000 (£41.2/€48.2/$54.4), while all transactions of ¥1m and above must be flagged to the regulatory authorities.Speaking yesterday, minister Keiichi Ishii, Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism, who is responsible for overseeing the integrated resorts project, said the government would now be inviting public comment on the proposals.The Abe Cabinet is aiming to finalise the regulations within nine months of the integrated resorts bill being passed by the Japanese Diet. With the law approved in July 2018, this would suggest regulations will be finalised in April this year.“Going forward, the Government aims at making Japan a leading nation in tourism, exerting every effort to establish the Casino Administration Committee and set forth the basic policies, as determined in the IR Development Act,” Abe added.The first resorts are not expected to open until 2024, with licences for three to be awarded initially. The exact location of the resorts is also yet to be determined, with a number of locations, such as Hokkaido, Okinawa, Osaka, Yokohama, Wakayama, Sasebo and the capital Tokyo under consideration.However MGM Resorts chief executive Jim Murren has suggested that he expects Osaka to be the first location permitted to host a resort, with the Expo 2025 universal exposition to be held in the city.MGM is just one of the casino operators that is aiming to secure a licence in the country, alongside Caesars Entertainment, Hard Rock International, Melco Resorts and Mohegan Gaming and Entertainment, among others. Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Casino & games Regions: Asia Japan Email Addresslast_img read more

Portugal iGaming Dashboard – Q2 2019

first_img Portugal iGaming Dashboard – Q2 2019 Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Tags: Card Rooms and Poker Mobile Online Gambling 12th August 2019 | By contenteditor AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Casino & games iGaming Business and Ficom Leisure are pleased to present the Portugal iGaming Dashboard, providing revenue, product and game metrics on the dot.pt regulated market.The data is updated quarterly following the official release of the figures by Portuguese regulator the Serviço de Regulação e Inspeção de Jogos (SRIJ).Portugal’s online gaming market enjoyed a strong first quarter, and this has continued into Q2. Revenue for the first six months of 2019 stands at €95.6m, more than the €78.9m generated over 12 months in 2018.This was achieved despite the lack of a major sporting event in July, which resulted in a month-on-month decline in sports betting revenue, which fell 7.3% to €23.0m.Despite European football’s off-season, the sport remained by far the most popular, accounting for 71.4% of turnover. Tennis came a distant second, with 16.4% of amounts wagered, followed by basketball on 7.5%.This was offset by growth in online casino, which now includes cash poker and poker tournaments. Revenue for the quarter rose to €25.2m, aided by the popularity of online slots.Slots generated 67.0% of online gaming turnover, ahead of French roulette on 13.5%, and blackjack on 8.1%.Scroll down and click on the drop down options to compare how Portugal’s igaming market has performed on a quarterly and annual basis.All data and figures are processed by leading European corporate advisory firm Ficom Leisure, a specialist in all segments of the betting and gaming sector.Ficom Leisure also provides monthly figures on the New Jersey online market in the New Jersey iGaming Dashboard, available on iGB North America. It also provides quarterly figures on the Spanish online market in the Spain iGaming Dashboard, on the Danish market in the Denmark iGaming Dashboard, and on the Italian market in the Italy iGaming Dashboard. Topics: Casino & games Finance Sports betting Poker iGaming Business and Ficom Leisure are pleased to present the Portugal iGaming Dashboard, providing revenue, product and game metrics on the dot.pt regulated market. The data is updated quarterly following the official release of the figures by Portuguese regulator the Serviço de Regulação e Inspeção de Jogos (SRIJ). Regions: Europe Western Europe Portugal Email Addresslast_img read more

RG Week special: The outsider perspective

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter A cultural shift in the industry has seen operators look to ramp up their responsible gaming controls, with many bringing in external help to do so, writes Daniel O’Boyle. But can external consultants really play a role in changing company culture?When Sweden was preparing to launch its re-regulated market for the start of 2019, longtime Svenska Spel responsible gambling advisors Zenita Strandänger and Monica Medvall (pictured) recognised something: their knowledge could prove useful to the market’s new entrants.“We hoped we would have an open window, as we would call it, where the new licence holders would like to have our help in developing their own responsible gaming strategy,” Medvall explains.The pair chose to seize that opportunity, leaving Svenska Spel to create Strandänger & Medvall, a consultancy focused on responsible gambling and sustainability.The first nine months in the market have suggested that they were certainly right about the difficulties of navigating responsible gambling in Sweden. Sanctions from Spelinspektionen, the Swedish Gambling Authority, are commonplace, while operator association Branschföreningen för Onlinespel decried the apparent lack of clarity of the regulatory framework. Perhaps as a result, operator and market revenue have both taken a hit.Yet Strandänger and Medvall didn’t seem to get as many calls as they expected.“Unfortunately, the gambling industry has not been active in looking for our help,” Medvall says. “Some of the gambling companies, mostly the former [monopoly operators] have been more eager to keep up their work. But the companies that were not licensed before 1 January this year now have a chance to contact us and, to be honest, we don’t know why they haven’t.”“Do they think that as a small business they can manage by themselves?” Medvall asks. “We don’t know just what the obstacle is.”While the uptake has been slow among new market entrants in Sweden, outside consultants that specialise in corporate social responsibility offer the potential, at least, for a fresh perspective on a company’s strategy.Raymond Bovero, pictured, right, has also provided advice to operators as a responsible gaming consultant, dealing mostly with lottery operators in Europe and Africa. He spent 22 years working for La Française des Jeux (FDJ), including 13 as the director of its responsible gambling programme, before going into consulting.Bovero says that he has been able to notice things from the outside that might otherwise have been missed by operators that are busy with day-to-day business. He cites the example of one lottery where he recognised a potential conflict of interest and encouraged the commissioning of a study into gambling in the country.“For one European lottery, they had the same director serving as both marketing director and responsible gambling director,” Bovero says. “I said maybe this would be the source of a conflict of interest, even though it was a very small lottery.“I also told them that they should sponsor a study, they should have what we in France call a mécène (sponsorship agreement). You fund the person, you fund a non-governmental organisation (NGO), but then you have no right to decide what they do with your money so you preserve the independence of the people you are giving money to.“I told them that they don’t even know what part of the population is playing their games, they don’t know what part of the population is at risk of excessive gambling,” he continues. “So I told them they need to fund an independent NGO and find out how much of the population played their games, and importantly, how many are at risk of being pathological gamblers, and who they are. In total, I wrote a report and gave them 30-35 recommendations of things to do and things not to do.”Telling it like it is Bovero says that his outside perspective allows him to call for change where internal employees who recognise problems may fear retribution for doing so.“As a consultant, I don’t fear the reaction if my propositions are different to the habits or the culture of the lottery,” he says. “I have no fear in telling people to try different things.”In addition, Bovero argues his perspective, after many years in the industry with FDJ, has proved useful in recognising the possible failings he sees, and determining the best way to tackle them. Thanks to his background, he can recognise smaller failings that he may have seen turn into larger ones in the past, he adds.“My main strength is that I know and have seen many, many different situations as someone who’s been with FDJ, as a consultant, as a former participant of the WLA working group,” Bovero explains. “I know many different situations. So compared to people who run the day-to-day, I can see things from a higher level.”However, Strandänger and Medvall have found that their own experience with Svenska Spel didn’t mean a guaranteed interest from operators. While those who were already heavily involved in Sweden were familiar with the duo’s experience, they may not have been as well-known to the new entrants.“We are really well known in Sweden as consultants, because we have been at Svenska Spel for many years and all the stakeholders here know us,” she points out. “But for some of the newer operators, it might be that they don’t know us.“Maybe that’s why the newer operators don’t have the same interest, I’m not sure. Perhaps we haven’t actually marketed ourselves [enough] to the newer operators.” Even when the clients are plentiful, the outside perspective is not without its challenges. Each client is different, but if business is booming it could be easy to attempt to shoehorn a one-size-fits-all approach into each client’s strategy.Bovero, for his part, says years of dealing with operators with diverse backgrounds, across a range of different markets, has taught him the importance of understanding each client’s specific needs.“You have to take the people where they are,” he says. “If I look at my customers from Africa and Eastern Europe, they are very different. You can’t say the same things to everybody. What I mean is that the consultant needs to give advice that is adaptive to where the customers are.”He picks out the example of a chief executive that wanted his business to secure the WLA’s Level 4 Responsible Gaming Certification. This requires buy-in from across the business, to compile a report (for which submissions regularly top 100 pages), and a full audit carried out by a WLA-approved provider.“He was at Level 2 and he wanted to reach Level 4 in one year,” Bovero says. “I had to tell him, ‘Take your time. When you do something, assess the landscape and measure the success of what you are doing.’”“If you do something that’s totally counter-cultural then you have no chance of being accepted.”But if a consultant whose perspective differs too strongly from the company risks alienating those they are supposed to help, how can they approach a business that appears culturally averse to responsible gambling? To Bovero, it can be a very slow process, but it all starts from the top.“It can be very different from one operator to the other, and it depends mainly on how the CEO is,” Bovero says. “When FDJ started its responsible gaming programme, when they told me to take the job running that in 2005, the CEO said, ‘Raymond, don’t go too fast nor too deep.’”“And I answered, ‘Well, I’ll do my best but as you know, patience is not my main quality.’ But in the end I had the honour of working for that CEO for 10 years, and when he left he thanked me for all my work in promoting responsible gaming.“When you start, it’s a cultural evolution and it can be quite difficult to make people think differently to how they’ve been thinking for the past 10, 20, 30 years,” Bovero continues. “Try to convince, not force, the people. Then, once you’ve convinced enough of the people, you can accelerate.”In Medvall’s view, doubts over whether an outside figure can understand a business may play a part in the modest interest in Strandänger & Medvall, but she believes there is a larger factor at play.“Maybe operators are afraid to have a consultant coming in and telling them what to do, but as far as running the business goes, most of them actually already think they are compliant,” she suggests.Towards a responsible future While Bovero’s business does involve substantial efforts to change the culture of operators, it might play an even bigger role for Strandänger & Medvall. Working mostly with lottery operators, Bovero says he is often able to win over sceptical would-be clients by reminding them of the lottery’s charitable goals.“I was moderating a seminar in Africa for the African Lottery Association and one of the people there said, ‘Responsible gaming is a nice concept but what about turnover? I need to make money.’ And of course if you do too much for responsible gambling that hurts turnover,” he recalls. “I told him that he needs to consider that there are good stakes and bad stakes, and with lotteries being created to improve the wellbeing of the population, getting stakes from addicted players are bad stakes.”For Medvall, on the other hand, prospective decision-makers are typically beholden to shareholders rather than the public, creating a dynamic that puts corporate social responsibility at odds with more straightforward business goals such as revenue.“Some businesses that have their shareholders may be thinking about the balance between responsible gambling and turnover,” Medvall said. “Because of that, maybe some of them don’t have the minimum that you would expect in responsible gaming.”As a result, Medvall says that when it comes to convincing possible clients, the long-term profitability of responsible gambling typically forms a major part of the pitch.“Some of them have begun to realise that in Sweden, to earn money, you have to be compliant with the law,” Medvall said. “But to be sustainable you have to go a little further. You have to think about the long-term perspective, and how you can do more.”However, while that approach may be the only way to convince many operators to consider an outside perspective on responsible gambling, it can lead to what Bovero calls “the paradox of responsible gambling”.“If you do it sincerely, in order to do actual good, then your image can improve,” Bovero says. “But if you do it only caring about your image, the people will know that you don’t care about them, you care only about yourself, and that will be very bad for your image.”And for those in a company who do care sincerely about responsible gambling, it can still be difficult to change things if you’re not in a position of power. In Bovero’s view, that’s why change can often only come from the outside.“Some people have fear, maybe some don’t have enough hope,” he says. “They have been told ‘no’ so many times that they don’t want to try again and hear another no.“So it might be part of the role of the consultant to give suggestions that nobody in the company would dare to suggest.”To find out more about Responsible Gambling Week and the resources available, please visit the website RG Week special: The outsider perspective 12th November 2019 | By Joanne Christie A cultural shift in the industry has seen operators look to ramp up their responsible gaming controls, with many bringing in external help to do so, writes Daniel O’Boyle. But can external consultants really play a role in changing company culture? Topics: Legal & compliance Lottery Marketing & affiliates People Strategy Tags: Online Gambling Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Regions: Europe Legal & compliance Email Addresslast_img read more

Dean McKenzie to take interim executive role with NZ’s RITA

first_img Tags: OTB and Betting Shops Race Track and Racino Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Dean McKenzie to take interim executive role with NZ’s RITA Horse racing 9th December 2019 | By contenteditor The chairman of New Zealand’s Racing Industry Transition Agency (RITA) Dean McKenzie will take on the role of executive director once current chief executive John Allen steps down at the end of 2019.McKenzie will serve in the role until June 2020, meaning he will be in place as the New Zealand government shepherds the Racing Industry Bill into law, after which RITA will evolve into TAB NZ.This, RITA said, would ensure the transitional body “maintains the momentum of significant urgent reform required to revitalise racing, while providing continuity and stability in the management of the day to day activities of the TAB”.It would be an extension of the responsibilities McKenzie had taken on when he was appointed chair in July this year, RITA added. McKenzie will be supported by RITA chief operating officer Stephen Henry, who will take on additional operational responsibilities until the end of June next year.It comes after Allen announced in September that he would leave his role at the end of the year following five years as chief executive of the TAB, then RITA.In the meantime, RITA will advertise for the role of a new chief executive to take TAB NZ forward from 1 July 2020, the date from which the Racing Industry Bill is due to be enacted. This is part of a two-step process, with the first piece of legislation – launched in April this year – allowing for the New Zealand Racing Board to be replaced by RITA.The second piece will herald a range of changes designed to safeguard the long-term future of racing in New Zealand, with TAB NZ to have the power to charge offshore operators for offering odds on racing and sporting events held in the country.In addition, operators taking bets from New Zealanders will be subject to a point of consumption tax, though controversially, will not be able to apply for licences.McKenzie, who has held a number of roles in sports and racing governance, will not be a candidate for the permanent position of TAB NZ chief executive.Last month, RITA fell short of its targets for the financial year ended 31 July 2019, after revenue declined 3.1% year-on-year to NZD$348.0m (£123.6m/€144.2m/$158.7m). However, later that month McKenzie revealed that turnover, gross betting margin and customers numbers were all ahead of budget in the year-to-date period beginning August 1. The chairman of New Zealand’s Racing Industry Transition Agency (RITA) Dean McKenzie will take on the role of executive director once current chief executive John Allen steps down at the end of 2019. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Regions: Oceania New Zealand Topics: People Sports betting Strategy Horse racing Email Addresslast_img read more

DraftKings losses widen further in Q1 despite revenue growth

first_img Regions: US Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter DraftKings and SBTech both saw revenue grow in the first quarter of 2020, but combined losses widened to $74.0m in the pair’s last full quarter before their merger closed. Sports betting Topics: Sports bettingcenter_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter DraftKings and SBTech both saw revenue grow in the first quarter of 2020, but combined losses widened to $74.0m in the pair’s last full quarter before their merger closed.The businesses officially merged in April, trading on the Nasdaq exchange under the DraftKings name, after agreeing the combination in December 2019.DraftKings and SBTech generated combined revenue of $113.5m for the three months to 31 March, up from $90.0m in Q1 2019.Of this sum, $88.5m came from the legacy DraftKings business, a 30.0% year-on-year increase. This came predominantly from its online betting, gaming and daily fantasy sports operations, which accounted for $83.7m of the total, up 28.8%. The remaining $4.8m was generated from other sources including retail sports betting.Read more on iGB North America. DraftKings losses widen further in Q1 despite revenue growth 15th May 2020 | By Daniel O’Boylelast_img read more

Four more unlicensed websites to be blocked in Australia

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Topics: Legal & compliance Legal Always Vegas, Gibson Casino, Malibu Club Casino and Viggoslots will be blocked after ACMA investigations found that the sites were operating in breach of the 2001 Interactive Gambling Act. Last month, the ACMA flagged both Dinkum Pokies and Fortune Clock Casino as operating illegally, having in August ordered eight sites to be blocked, 11 in July and nine in January. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Four more unlicensed websites to be blocked in Australia Tags: Block Legal More than 100 illegal operators have also pulled out of the Australian market since the ACMA started enforcing new rules for offshore gambling in 2017.center_img The latest order means that the ACMA has requested more than 30 websites be blocked so far this year. 18th November 2020 | By Robert Fletcher Regions: Australia Email Address The Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) is set to request internet service providers (ISPs) to block access to a further four offshore gambling websites. Since the ACMA made its first blocking request in November 2019, some 180 illegal gambling websites have been blocked. The ACMA, which said it received a number of complaints about the websites, has urged customers who have an account with the sites to withdraw any funds as soon as possible.last_img read more

Abios explains how data will drive growth of esports betting

first_img Abios explains how data will drive growth of esports betting Email Address Tags: Abios Esports AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 9th March 2021 | By contenteditor Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Topics: Esports Tech & innovation ICE365 Content Series esports betting Regions: Nordics Sweden They outline the ways data is collected and discuss how the business aims to solve the pain points that sportsbook operators deal with when expanding into esports. Chief executive Oskar Fröberg and chief technology officer Anton Janér provide insights on how esports data differs from stats collected on traditional sports. ICE365 Content Serieslast_img read more

Total Gamstop registrations pass 200,000 as sign-ups increase in early 2021

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Problem gambling Total Gamstop registrations pass 200,000 as sign-ups increase in early 2021 6th April 2021 | By Conor Mulheir Topics: Social responsibility Problem gambling Responsible gambling “We’re pleased that Gamstop is serving as an effective safety net, providing crucial breathing space to those who are struggling with their gambling,” said Fiona Palmer, the scheme’s chief executive. Gamstop recorded its highest daily figure of registrations on 22 February, as 326 people signed up to the scheme within 24 hours. “Awareness around self-exclusion schemes and blocking software has been increasing throughout the last year, and it is important that we continue to spread the message about what help is available to those who need it most.” In February, registrations increased 21% year-on-year, with close to 6,500 people registering with the scheme. This followed a 14% increase in January, which saw over 7,000 new registrations. Gamstop’s registration of its 200,000th user, which it said was not expected until later in the year, coincided with the anniversary of a change to self-exclusion regulation brought in last year. Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter From 31 March 2020, it became a requirement for all online operators to be registered with Gamstop. The scheme said 71% of its registrants are male and 29% female, with the number of women registered recently surpassing 55,000. The majority of registrants come from the 18-34 age group, at 59%. This, Gamstop said, was evidence that “self-exclusion is not a silver bullet”, stating that it advocates a layered approach to tackling problem gambling including seeking treatment alongside self-exclusion. Email Address Gamstop said this is part of the reason it is collaborating with GamCare and Gamban for the TalkBanStop campaign, which promotes the use of a range of tools and support via the National Gambling Helpline. Regions: UK & Ireland The charity said that in January 2021, 49,328 Gamstop users, out of a possible 177,038, attempted to gamble and were successfully blocked by the scheme. Online self-exclusion scheme Gamstop now has over 200,000 registrants, following record numbers of sign-ups in the first two months of 2021.last_img read more

Canadian single-match betting bill passes first round, includes esports

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter 7th April 2021 | By contenteditor What esports betting operators should consider Canada is an exciting market and one that is similar to the United States, which many sites consider a top priority for expansion. Sites that already operate in legal provinces will significantly benefit from their previous expansion efforts, but new sites shouldn’t pass up such a big opportunity. Esports By Kenneth Williams Many bookmakers will jump on the chance to enter Canada, but it won’t be as straightforward as simply adding .ca to the end of your website. There’s a general consensus among marketing experts that Canada and the US must be treated differently, but their opinions often conflict when it comes to exactly how. It’s best to follow the marketing examples set by existing Canadian bookies. Particularly eager sites could immediately enter the existing Canadian market in preparation for regulation at the federal level. Topics: Esports esports regulation Existing betting operators, meanwhile, will enjoy a big advantage when the markets open. An existing user base will be a powerful tool in gaining nationwide popularity. Some betting operators might have Canada on the backburner due to its scattered legality, but a handful of promotions and an advertisement bump could go a long way to establishing a presence. The Safe and Regulated Sports Betting Act timeline implies that it will be formally enacted this winter, right in the midst of Canada’s most iconic sports seasons and the return of LAN esports. The SRSBA passed through the House of Commons by 303 votes to 15. The bill received overwhelming unilateral support from both the Liberals and Conservatives. The economic incentives of regulating sports gambling have become even more attractive after the pandemic. Judging by standard Canadian political timelines, match bets will likely become legal towards the end of the year.  Tags: Esports Canada Parliament Bill Canada is a very sought-after market for oddsmakers. The country has a rich competitive history across several winter sports, a vested interest in professional USA leagues and a long history of excellence in Valve esports. Some of the most famous players in Dota 2 history hail from Canada, including Artour ‘Arteezy’ Babaev, Jacky ‘EternaLEnVy’ Mao and Kurtis ‘Aui_2000’ Ling. Russel ‘Twistzz’ Van Dulken and Keith ‘NAF’ Markovic are both very popular among tactical FPS fans.center_img Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter A lot of provinces only offer sports betting through a national system known as the Pro-Line, which the Atlantic Lottery maintains. Bettors must make multiple bets at a time in most regions, sometimes being forced to parlay. The SRSBA formally legalises single-match bets placed outside of the Pro-Line. This change will start a competition between sportsbooks for millions of new bettors. Ratification seems to be a formality after Act receives positive backing from the country’s MPs. Email Address On 17 February, the Canadian House of Commons voted to approve the Safe and Regulated Sports Betting Act of 2021. The bill still needs to be formally approved by the rest of parliament to become law, but overwhelming support from the Commons points to a swift enactment. Many Canadian sports fans already enjoy esports betting thanks to provincial regulation. Opening up the entire country would remove many of the logistical hurdles and grey areas currently keeping operators at bay. The Act specifically regulates single-game betting, which is currently illegal in several Canadian provinces. The majority of gambling legislation in Canada is regional, but the Safe and Regulated Sports Betting Act will set national precedence and federally approve single-game bets. Several regional laws currently restrict single-game betting, often demanding parleys or combo bets if allowing them at all. In addition to their traditional counterparts, esports are formally recognised in the wording of the bill. The announcement has already elicited responses from some of the biggest names in esports gambling, with the Esports Entertainment Group among many other major sportsbooks quickly announcing its intention to pursue Canadian customers. Canadian single-match betting bill passes first round, includes esports Canadian betting will explode in 2021last_img read more

12